RSS

Eco Focus – The new life #Literature #African #Stories #Kids #Freebies #Education #SaveOurPlanet #NaturesHideaway #Education #Wildlife

Eco Focus – The new life.

 

Eco Focus - Learning to be quiet in the wilds

Written by Elle Durow:

It is October, — almost the end of October, and the early spring flowers have finished their blooming for this year. It is growing too warm for those delicate plants that dare to brave even the August winds, and can withstand the frost better than the summer heat.

Down at the edge of the pool the tall reeds and sedges are tossing their heads a little in the wind, and swinging a little, lightly and lazily, with the motion of the water; but the water is almost clear and still this morning, with scarcely a ripple, and in its beautiful, broad mirror reflecting the trees on the bank, and the little points of land that run out from the shore, and give foothold to the old trees standing guard day and night, summer and winter, to watch over the stream.

Do you think now that you know how the pool looks in the sunshine of this October morning?

If we come close to the edge where the sedges are growing, and look down through the clear water, we should see some fearsome-looking and clumsy black bugs crawling upon the bottom of the pool.  They have six legs, and are covered with a coat of armour laid plate over plate.  It looks hard and horny; and the insect itself has a dull, heavy way about it, and might be called very stupid were it not for it’s eagerness to catch and eat every little fly and mosquito that comes within it’s reach.  It’s eyes grow fierce and almost bright; and it seizes its prey with an open mouth, and consumes it all day long, if he can find any thing suited to its taste.

I am afraid you may think that it is not very interesting, and will not care to make its acquaintance.  But, let me tell you, something very wonderful is about to happen to it; and if you stay and watch patiently, you will see what I saw once, and have never forgotten.

Here it is crawling in mud under the water this spring morning: out over the pool swim the flat water-boatmen, and the water-spiders dance and skip as if the pool were a floor of glass; while here and there skims a blue dragon-fly, with its fine, firm wings that look like the thinnest gauze, but are really extremely strong for all their delicate appearance.

The dull, black bug sees all these bright, agile insects; and, for the first time in its life, it feels discontented with his own low place in the mud.  A longing creeps through it that is quite different from the customary longing for mosquitoes and flies.

“I will creep up the stem of this rush,” he thinks; “and perhaps, when I reach the surface of the water, I can dart like the little flat boatmen, or, better than all, shoot through the air like the blue-winged dragon-fly.”

 But, as it crawls laboriously up the slippery stem, the feeling that it has no wings like the dragon-fly makes it discouraged and almost despairing.  At last, however, with much effort it has reached the surface, has crept out of the water, and, clinging to the green stem, feels the spring air and sunshine all about it.  Now let it take passage with the boatmen, or ask some of the little spiders to dance.  Why doesn’t it begin to enjoy itself?

Alas, see its sad disappointment.  After all this effort, after passing some splendid chances of good breakfasts on the way up, and spending all its strength on this one exploit, it finds the fresh air suffocating, and a most strange and terrible feeling coming over it, as the coat-of-mail, which until now was always kept wet, shrinks, and seems even to be splitting off while the warm air dries it.

“Oh,” thinks the poor bug, “I must die!  It was folly of me to crawl up here.  The mud and the water were good enough for my brothers, and good enough for me too, had I only known it; and now I am too weak, and feel too strange, to attempt going down again the way I came up.”

See how uneasy it grows, feeling about in doubt and dismay, for a darkness is coming over hits eyes.  It is the black helmet, a part of his coat-of-mail; that has broken off at the top, and is falling down over its face.  A minute more, and it drops below the chin; and what is its astonishment to find, that, as the old face breaks away, a new one comes in its place, larger, much more beautiful, and having two of the most admirable eyes! — two, I say, because they look like two, but each of them is made up of hundreds of little eyes.  They stand out globe-like on each side of his head, and look about over a world unknown and wonderful to the dull, black bug that lived in the mud.  The sky seems bluer, the sunshine brighter, and the nodding grass and flowers more gay and graceful. Now it lifts this new head to see more of the great world; and behold! as it moves, it is drawing itself out of the old suit of armour, and from two neat little cases at its sides come two pairs of wings, folded up like fans, and put away here to be ready for use when the right time comes: they are still half folded, and must be carefully spread open and smoothed for use.  And while he trembles with surprise, see how with every movement he is escaping from the old armour, and drawing from their sheaths fine legs, longer and far more beautifully and coloured than the old; and a slender body that was packed away like a magnifying-glass, and is now drawn out slowly, one part after another; until at last the dark coat-of-mail dangles empty from the sedges, and above it sits a dragon-fly with great, wondering eyes, long, slender body, and two pairs of delicate, gauzy wings, — fine and firm as the very ones it had been watching barely an hour ago.

The poor black bug who thought t was dying was only passing out of its old life to be born into a higher one; and see how much brighter and more beautiful it is!

And now I will tell you how, months ago, the mother dragon-fly dropped her tiny eggs into the water, which lay there in the mud, and by and by hatched out the dark, crawling bugs, so unlike the mother that she does not know them as her children, and, flying over the pool, looks down through the water where they crawl among the sedges, and has not a single word to say to them; until, in due time, they find their way up to the air, and pass into the new winged life.

If you will go to some pool when spring is ending or summer beginning, and find among the water-grasses such an insect as I have told you about, you may see all this for yourself; and you will agree with me, that nothing you have ever known is more wonderful.

 

The Save Our Planet Network is devoted to keeping people informed about what is happening to the world’s natural ecosystems, people’s livelihoods, etc as a result of human activities which are seriously damaging the quality of life on Earth.

 We also try to persuade people to be more compassionate and to care for all of Nature’s creatures from minute microbes to the largest mammals – this includes all humans who are also part of the natural world.

One of our main focuses is on educating people about what is happening and to try to encourage them to alter their lifestyles and attitudes to correct the damage that has already happened.

We do this by publishing a monthly e-news magazine, Eco Focus, and through the medium of the internet via our websites:

We also publish e-books which are also available free of charge on these websites.

via Eco Focus – The new life.

 

Tags: , ,

Eco Focus – Ingwe – the leopard ~ An African Wildllife Story for Children #literature #Freebies by Elle Durow, Nature’s Hideaway #Conservation #Wildlife

Eco Focus – Ingwe – the leopard.

Eco Focus - Learning to be quiet in the wilds

Written by Elle Durow:

The sun had just disappeared below the horizon and Ngulube the bushpig made his way down the river bank to dig for tender succulent roots in the damp soil just above the waterline of the river.  He found a spot where the alien Syringa trees were growing and proceeded to dig for the soft roots with his snout.  He was particularly fond of the bark on the Syringa roots.

 As Ngulube dug a shadowy form materialised out of a thicket on the river bank above Ngulube.  As the form emerged from the darkness of the thicket its golden hide with black rosettes became visible.  It was Ingwe the leopard and she was on the prowl for something satisfy her hunger.  Leopards consider bushpigs to be a delicacy.  She spotted Ngulube below her and immediately lowered her body so as to reduce her silhouette and become less visible.  Silently she crept closer to Ngulube who was really enjoying his meal.  When she got close enough Ingwe suddenly leaped onto Ngulube’s back and sank her teeth into his neck.  Ngulube struggled for a while and became weaker as the blood drained out of the wounds that Ingwe had inflicted on him.  He didn’t last long and soon Ingwe started to feast on him, starting with his hindquarters.  When Ingwe had eaten her fill she dragged Ngulube’s remains up the river bank and hid them under some bushes in the thicket from whence she had come.

 Ngulube’s remains provided enough food for Ingwe to last her for a week.  During this time she would retire into her favourite thicket to lie around and rest during the day.  At night, just after dusk, she would slip out of her hiding place and feed on Ngulube’s carcase and then, when she had eaten her fill, she would go down to the river to quench her thirst.

 Towards the end of the week, as the sun was setting in the west, she suddenly smelt something that excited her for she was on heat.  The faint scent of a male leopard reached her nostrils.  At the same time the pheromones given off by Ingwe guided the male leopard to her.  A shiver of excitement ran through Ingwe as the male approached her through the bush.  Although she wanted to mate with him she would not surrender easily.  When he got nearer she snarled at him, but still he advanced on her.  When he got within striking distance she lashed out at him with her front paw and scratched him along his cheek.  He struck back at her, but only half-heartedly.  He also snarled at her.  After a while of this foreplay Ingwe submitted to the male and they united in the act of mating.  Thereafter she let out a sigh and led him to her favourite lair where they both lay down together and rested.

The male leopard stayed with Ingwe for another week during which they hunted together and killed an Impala which they dragged up onto the branches of a tree so that their food would be protected from the jackals that scavenge in the area.

 During the time that the male leopard spent with Ingwe they would often climb into a tall dead tree during the day so that they could observe all of the goings-on in the neighbourhood.

 

 

 

 

The Save Our Planet Network is devoted to keeping people informed about what is happening to the world’s natural ecosystems, people’s livelihoods, etc as a result of human activities which are seriously damaging the quality of life on Earth.

 We also try to persuade people to be more compassionate and to care for all of Nature’s creatures from minute microbes to the largest mammals – this includes all humans who are also part of the natural world.

One of our main focuses is on educating people about what is happening and to try to encourage them to alter their lifestyles and attitudes to correct the damage that has already happened.

We do this by publishing a monthly e-news magazine, Eco Focus, and through the medium of the internet via our websites:

We also publish e-books which are also available free of charge on these websites.

via Eco Focus – Ingwe – the leopard.

 

Tags: ,

Eco Focus – Children’s Corner – Save Our Planet Network

Eco Focus – Children’s Corner.

This is the part of the Eco Focus website that will be of interest to those young (and not so young) browsers who want to read some stories that have nature as their theme.

Some of the stories are true and others are fictional; some have been passed down through time in folklore.

Enjoy your read!

Eco Focus - Children's Corner

The Save Our Planet Network is devoted to keeping people informed about what is happening to the world’s natural ecosystems, people’s livelihoods, etc as a result of human activities which are seriously damaging the quality of life on Earth.

 We also try to persuade people to be more compassionate and to care for all of Nature’s creatures from minute microbes to the largest mammals – this includes all humans who are also part of the natural world.

One of our main focuses is on educating people about what is happening and to try to encourage them to alter their lifestyles and attitudes to correct the damage that has already happened.

We do this by publishing a monthly e-news magazine, Eco Focus, and through the medium of the internet via our websites:

We also publish e-books which are also available free of charge on these websites.

via Eco Focus – Children’s Corner.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

The Sanctuary Wildlife Care + Rehabilitation Centre, Snake/Reptile Park at PMB Royal Show

A selection of photographs taken from the annual award-winning stand, set up by Garth and Carol Carpenter, of their snakes and other reptiles, which are on display at the Pietermaritzburg Royal Show in 2013, with the theme being the Chinese Year, and Snakes from around the world. Enjoy!

Click on the images to enlarge and for a description.

http://twitter.com/thesanctuaryza

Posted by http://twitter.com/Donnette

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 29, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

RHINO WAR NEWS EXPOSE – 3 – Brian Sandberg re Mozambique/KNP Poaching & Top Stories – 26/04 G2

“The KrugerPark Rhino Killing Fields” & the “Mozambique Poaching War Zone”

NB : The Mozambique War Zone also embraces the Ndumo & Tembe Game Reserves in KZN Maputaland & threatens the cross-border Futi Corridor Project linking the two countries !!

The last of the few remaining rhino poached in Mozambique, adjoining the KrugerNational Park

Rhino Poaching Apocalypse 2013 – 250++ at 25/04

South Africa’s Shame

Moz.Blog.01.10April2013.doc.docx
Moz.Blog.02.20April2013.doc.docx

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 29, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

#Press release: How to save the #Elephants of Central #Africa #Congo #Eco #Free #ebooks

HOW TO SAVE THE ELEPHANTS OF CENTRAL AFRICA
RECOMMENDATIONS FROM CONSERVATION ORGANIZATIONS
Press Conference in Brazzaville, Republic of Congo
26 April 2013

African Parks Network (APN)
International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW)
Fondation pour le Tri-National de Sangha (FTNS)
Projet d’appui à l’Application de la Loi sur la Faune Sauvage (PALF)
TRAFFIC
Union Internationale pour la Conservation de la Nature (UICN)
Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)
WWF

Press Communication – 26 April 2013 – Brazzaville, Republic of Congo – APN, IFAW, FTNS, TRAFFIC, PALF, UICN, WCS, WWF
Brazzaville, Republic of Congo (26 April 2013)

The elephants of Central Africa are dying.

A recent study1 shows forest elephant populations in the CongoBasin fell by almost two-thirds – or 62% –
over the past decade as a result of extensive ivory poaching.

Without action, it is likely that the elephant, the largest land mammal on earth, will follow in the footsteps of
the rhinoceroses in Central Africa, which have been hunted to extinction for their horns.

This wildlife crime has a destabilizing effect on the governance of countries in the sub-region. Rampant
poaching and illegal wildlife trade nurtures international criminality and undermines the economic and social
prospects of Central African states. It is in the economic interest of these countries to vigorously combat this
scourge.

Therefore, we, who represent many of the largest conservation organizations active in the CongoBasin, are
convened here to propose effective solutions to this poaching crisis. The states of the sub-region must
implement these solutions in order to save their elephants, which they themselves have qualified as a
universal natural heritage of humanity.2

To save this natural heritage, it is imperative, and in the shortest time period possible, that the presidents
or the prime ministers of the Central African States lead the fight against wildlife crime by piloting and
overseeing National Coordination Units (NCUs). These units, which will be comprised of experts from the
administrations of the Prime Minister, the Counter-Intelligence, Justice, Wildlife, Police, Customs and
Defense, will share information, coordinate field operations, prosecution, and collaborate with technical
partners.

At the supranational level, the heads of these NCUs should coordinate with the countries of the region, on a
case-by-case basis, depending on the information at hand and the urgency of the situation. These units will
share information with their counterparts in the countries that have associated links with wildlife criminality
– including transit countries for illegal wildlife products such as Nigeria, Sudan, Togo and Guinea Conakry –
and with specialized international organizations such as INTERPOL.

Finally, the monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of these NCUs must be made by the Forestry
Commission of Central Africa on an annual basis and be based on information received by email from the
heads of the NCUs.

In addition, the states of Central Africa must immediately:

1. Signal to poachers and the criminal trafficking networks that the natural heritage of Central Africa
will be defended – The Heads of State in the CongoBasin must promulgate and publicly announce
stringent measures against wildlife crime.

2. Adopt an attitude of "zero tolerance" against corruption – Undue influence, abuse of power and
other forms of corruption relating to trading are the primary obstacles to effective enforcement
against major traffickers of illegal wildlife products in Central Africa.

3. Increase the penalties and strengthen enforcement relating to wildlife crimes, as well as crimes
relating to the sale of arms and large-scale ammunition-based hunting. Earlier this week, Mr. Yury
Fedotov, Executive Director of the United Nations Office against Drugs and Crime (UNODC), called
for wildlife offenses to be punished with imprisonment of four years or more.3 Undocumented
weapons and ammunition seized in flagrante delicto should systematically be destroyed.

4. Focus on the protection and proper management of certain priority protected areas – These areas
should become core areas for the protection of wildlife in the sub-region and be co-managed long
term by specialized non-governmental agencies.

5. Initiate a dialogue with consumer countries – China and Thailand are, respectively, the largest ivory
consumer and the largest center of legal ivory trade in the world. In the long-term, the survival of
the elephants in Central Africa and throughout the world depends on the end of international ivory
demand. Thus, it is essential that the Central Africa States have bilateral dialogues with China and
Thailand, explaining the ecological, economic and security consequences of their demand for ivory.
It is important to note that the Central Africa States have already begun implementing a number of these
recommendations, including through regional institutions.4 It is particularly encouraging to note that some
countries have already started strengthening their wildlife laws, making their first arrests and convictions of
major traffickers, as well as making audits of their ivory stocks and destroying them.

That said, Central Africa is pressed for time, and wildlife criminals are still active throughout the region. We
are here to ask the Central Africa States, the guardians of these elephants, to renew their efforts to save this
natural heritage.

A certain amount of regional coordination is needed. Nevertheless, it is countries of Central Africa who are
capable of saving the elephants. The survival of this natural heritage of elephants depends entirely on the
willingness of the states, their governments and their citizens to take steps to stop wildlife criminality.
We, the conservation organizations, look forward to continuing to work with the Central Africa States to end
large-scale poaching and wildlife crime.

The time for talk is over. Take Action!

1 Devastating Decline of Forest Elephants in Central Africa – PloSOne 4 March 2013.
2 Déclaration sur la Lutte Anti-Braconnage en Afrique Centrale – Réunion d’Urgence des Ministres de la CEEAC le 21-23 mars 2013.
Press Communication – April 26, 2013 – Brazzaville, Republic of Congo –FTNS, TRAFFIC, PALF, UICN, WCS, WWF
3 See http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/frontpage/2013/April/heads-of-unodc-and-cites-urge-wildlife-and-forest-offences-to-be-treatedas-
serious-transnational-organized-crimes.html

4 See, among others, Plan d’Action sous régional des Pays de l’Espace COMIFAC pour le renforcement de l’Application des
Législations nationales sur la Faune Sauvage, Déclaration finale de la réunion de ministre sur la lutte anti-braconnage en Afrique
Centrale and the Plan d’Extrême Urgence de Lutte Anti Braconnage.

Press Communication – 26 April 2013 – Brazzaville, Republic of Congo – APN, IFAW, FTNS, TRAFFIC, PALF, UICN, WCS, WWF

For more information please contact:
APN Norbert GAMI Community Coordinator
norbertg +242 05 73 37 311
IFAW Anselme NONGAMANI IFAW Coordinator in Congo
nongamani +242 06 65 95 192
FTNS Timothée FOMETE Director, Tri-National de Sangha
fometetim +237 99 93 64 46
PALF Gilles MIAMBANZILA Head of Communications
Hermanndegilles +242 06 68 34 121
TRAFFIC Louisette Sylvie NGO YEBEL Head of Communications TRAFFIC Africa
Louisette.ngo-yebel +237 91 49 25 61 / +237 79 51 72 84
UICN Léonard USONGO Head of Cameroun Programme
Leonard.USONGO +237 77 93 33 31
WCS Jérôme Mokoko Assistant Director General WCS Congo
Jrmokoko +242 05 55 11 785
WWF Jules CARON Head of Communications for WWF anti-poaching program in Central Africa
jcaron +237 79 51 90 97

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 29, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

The Wildlife Sanctuary Care and Rehabilitation Centre, beautiful original products for next to nothing on Zazzle – Wildlife NPO

72f32ce4a999acbed085ed988d335821?s=50&d=identicon&r=G

The Wildlife Sanctuary Care and Rehabilitation Centre, beautiful original products for next to nothing on Zazzle – Wildlife NPO

by Donnette E Davis

See my store at Zazzle The Sanctuary Wildlife Care and Rehabilitation Center is run as a non-profit organization, from premises situated outside of Pietermaritzburg (between PMB and Durban) in KwaZuluNatal, South Africa and offers hundreds of designs and products for sale at extremely low prices through Zazzle. "Wildlife Crusaders – where saving lives of abandoned, […]

Read more of this post

Donnette E Davis | March 1, 2013 at 8:02 pm | Categories: Wildlife, zazzle | URL: http://wp.me/p77dO-yJ

Comment See all comments Like
Trouble clicking? Copy and paste this URL into your browser:
http://donnette.wordpress.com/2013/03/01/the-wildlife-sanctuary-care-and-rehabilitation-centre-beautiful-original-products-for-next-to-nothing-on-zazzle-wildlife-npo/
Thanks for flying with wp-footericon.pngWordPress.com

b.gif?host=donnette.wordpress.com&blog=1696060&post=2153&subd=donnette&ref=&email=1&email_o=wpcom

Donnette E Davis | March 1, 2013 at 8:08 pm | Categories: Uncategorized | URL: http://wp.me/pveJg-db

Comment See all comments Like
Trouble clicking? Copy and paste this URL into your browser:
http://staidenshomeschool.wordpress.com/2013/03/01/the-wildlife-sanctuary-care-and-rehabilitation-centre-beautiful-original-products-for-next-to-nothing-on-zazzle-wil-dlife-npo/
Thanks for flying with wp-footericon.pngWordPress.com

b.gif?host=wordpress.com&blog=7444790&post=817&subd=staidenshomeschool&ref=&email=1&email_o=wpcom

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 1, 2013 in Uncategorized

 
 
%d bloggers like this: